Be sure you’re in a positive frame of mind before reading the news headlines because they will scare the $#!+ out of you. What’s happening in the economy may seem way above your head, if you’re trying to understand it, but that doesn’t matter when it comes to protecting your job and securing your financial future.

Why doesn’t it matter? It doesn’t matter because the principles you’ll need to live by are not based solely on the fake money system you live under. Yes, we are ultimately subject to the fact that we live in an inflationary economy, but so long as we do, there are things you can do to stay clear of the storm.

What is Inflation, and Why Should I Give a Damn?

Inflation is not the rise in prices. The rise in prices is the result of inflation. What is inflation then? Inflation is the increase of the money supply. It’s when the Treasury Department literally turns on the printing press to turn out thousands of sheets of freshly printed paper money. Inflation also includes easy access to credit.

Once the newly printed money is sent into the economy, those who get it first get to spend it when it has greater value. However, once it trickles down and gets to you and I, it has lost its value and this “new money” causes prices to rise.

In light of that, think about your savings account, if you have one. Let’s say you have $1,000.00 in your savings account. You were told by your bank that you can receive interest on the cash you put in a savings account. That means that at the end of the year, your money increased, right?

Buy Some Metal!

No, it didn’t. You probably lost money. Here’s why. The average interest rate of a savings account in 2010 was 0.80 percent. Some banks offer higher rates, but that requires you keeping a certain amount of money in your savings account along with paying bank fees, etc.

The problem is that the inflation rate was 3.5% in 2011. This is why inflation is often called the “hidden tax,” because the value of the paper money you have in the bank is decreasing in value at a faster rate (losing 3.5% of its value) than your bank’s interest rate will pay you (0.80%). In short, you’re losing money by saving it.

If you’re concerned about saving, then you should consider using some of that cash to buy gold and silver, because precious metals retain their value over time. That $100 of silver you buy will be worth the same 20 years from now, and you can always exchange your metals for cash should you need it. It’s a great means to protecting your money.

Protect Your Money by Spending It

Another way to protect yourself is to spend your money. That’s right, I said, spend it. Why? You want to use the money while it has greater value. The longer you hold on to it, the less it’s worth.

Now, I’m not talking about buying crap like televisions, steak dinners, and clothes. First, use the money to pay off your debts. If you have $5,000.00 in a savings account, but $10,000.00 in credit card debt and car loans, the interest on the loans are costing you a whole lot more than you’re gaining from the bank. It’s better to cut your debt in half and then take your monthly portion for savings to pay down the balance of your loans.

After debts are paid, then what? Should you put the money in the bank? I wouldn’t. After debts are paid, I would invest in “human capital.” What’s that? Human capital is ME, and unlike paper money, I will retain my value in the marketplace if I maximize my personal resources.

Invest in YOU!

Use your money to invest in you by looking for ways to start a side business—especially one that you can operate out of home. Maybe you’ve played around with designing web sites. Take your money and buy the tools and training needed to become great at it, and then invest in marketing yourself to a particular niche.

Let’s say you love guns and hunting as well. Then target that market with your web services. Learn all you can about how to promote web sites, and use social media, so you can offer to help gun and hunting businesses to build and push their web sites.

You could go to a community college to learn advanced coding, or you could take software courses online at sites like totaltraining.com. Do this while you’re still working your day job, and in the event that you get laid off, you’ve got a side business going that could help you survive the unemployment storm. Better yet, your business could take off and you won’t need your job anymore.

Or, you could use your money for enhancing certain skills that would make you even more valuable at your existing job. Learn to improve your writing and speaking skills. Learn some marketing skills that your boss could use to increase his business. Make yourself difficult to let go.

Be Proactive or Risk Serious Consequences

The point is that you must be proactive in protecting yourself, your family, and your money from an economic system that is set against you. No one else can do this for you, and it does no good to put your head in the sand and pretend that things will get better.

  1. Buy gold and silver to protect the value of your cash.
  2. Use your cash to pay off debts first.
  3. Use your cash to invest in yourself.

C. J. Ortiz
C. J. Ortiz

My mission is to help equip people to maximize their resources for a purpose greater than themselves. That's what my own mentors and teachers have done for me, and I'm paying it forward. Life can be merciless, and the world can be a messed up place, so what's needed is a stronger people that can both endure and overcome in life. My motto is, "In whatever you do, don't suck! Metal up!"

Leave a comment! Let me hear from you!

    14 replies to "How to Protect Your Money, and Your Job, from a Hellish Economy"

    • Builddiscipline

      Thanks for the interesting post!

      What motivated me is seeing the result of day by day self-improvement.
      I’m writing a blog on self-discipline, which is key when it comes to increasing your productivity.

      Maybe you will like to read some about it on my blog?
      http://www.builddiscipline.com

      Thanks!

    • Ntwydamelia

      You sound a lot like my hero, Ron Paul…

    • C. J. - The Metal Motivator

      I’m also from the Austrian school of economics, and a son of liberty.

    • C. J. - The Metal Motivator

      Thanks for writing. Good luck with your blog.

    • Alashtay

      Right on the money there C.J!

    • Metaljohn

      Awesome I am working on these steps myself right now.I have been thinking about for to long and now am reassured that I was on the right path after reading this.
      Thanks CJ

    • Metaljohn

      Awesome I am working on these steps myself right now.I have been thinking about for to long and now am reassured that I was on the right path after reading this.
      Thanks CJ

    • Metaljohn

      Awesome I am working on these steps myself right now.I have been thinking about for to long and now am reassured that I was on the right path after reading this.
      Thanks CJ

    • Metaljohn

      Awesome I am working on these steps myself right now.I have been thinking about for to long and now am reassured that I was on the right path after reading this.
      Thanks CJ

    • C. J. - The Metal Motivator

      That’s great, John. I know the feeling. You want to be able to move forward with confidence. Glad the article helped to those ends, bro.

    • C. J. - The Metal Motivator

      Excuse the pun! 😉

    • Richard

      Hey C.J.
      Some of the best advice I’ve seen in a while! You are so spot on! You make so many good points it’s hard to pick a favorite. Investing in YOU is right up there. Not enough people have a plan B these days!

      Great article!
      RichardP

    • C. J. - The Metal Motivator

      Hey Richard! Great to hear from you, my friend. Thanks so much for the encouraging words. I hope the business is going well.

    • Gary897

      As my job looks like it may be playing out, I have been looking for some info on where to turn and what to do. Your article along with the rest of the website gave me some good solid info that helps a bunch. Thanks!

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